Save Water, Earth & Lives

Public Water Supply Contaminated With Arsenic

Arsenic is a semi-metal element, it’s odorless, tasteless and it’s surprisingly quite commonly found in the public water supply across the globe causing detrimental health conditions.

The hazardous effects of Arsenic first attracted attention in the early 1990’s when a young man named Rezaul Morol nearly died in Bangladesh from arsenic poisoning by drinking contaminated well-water.

The major source of arsenic in drinking water is due to runoff from agricultural and industrial practices and from erosion of natural arsenic-rich rock deposits.

 

Studies done by both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and The National Academy of Sciences report that arsenic in drinking water causes cancer in the bladder, lung, skin, kidney, liver, prostate, and nasal passages.

Studies also found that arsenic harms the central and peripheral nervous systems, the heart and blood vessels, causes serious skin problems, and birth defects.

The EPA warns the public of Arsenic’s non-cancer effects: thickening and discoloration of the skin, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting; diarrhea; numbness in hands and feet; partial paralysis; and even blindness.

And unfortunately drinking bottled water is not necessarily any safer than tap water. Often, up to 40% of all the bottled water produced, is nothing more than tap water.

The EPA has regulations that apply to the public water supply, but they do NOT apply to the bottled water industry.

So in the end, your bottled water might be even more dangerous than your tap water…


REFERENCES

  1. Adya Clarity 30-Day Human Clinical Trial Report. [link]
  2. Adya Clarity’s EPA Certified Lab Tests Reports on Water. [link]
  3. Directory of Ground and Drinking Water. From United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). [link]
  4. Arsenic in Drinking Water. Published by Natural Resources Defense Council. [link]
  5. Arsenic in Drinking Water. Published by World Health Organization (WHO). [link]
  6. Drinking-Water Arsenic Exposure Modulates Gene Expression in Human Lymphocytes from a U.S. Population. Published by National Center for Biotechnology Information.[link]

 

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